Native american ethnobotany database. 102 uses documented. Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail....

A short history, in reverse order: This database is t

Founded in 1961, the Journal of American Indian Education (JAIE) is a journal featuring original scholarship on education issues of American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Indigenous peoples worldwide, including First Nations, Māori, Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander peoples, and Indigenous peoples of Latin America, Africa, and ...The Asteraceae is the largest family of plants in North America and is widely used as medicine by Indigenous peoples. This study investigated the medicinal ethnobotany of North American Asteraceae to identify taxa that appear preferentially selected or avoided for general and specific medicinal uses. Asteraceae-specific ethnobotanical reports recorded in the Native American Ethnobotany ..."African-American" is a divisive misnomer for native-born Black Americans. STOP using that term. Now Vice-President-elect Sen. Kamala Harris has brought an issue to the fore, as journalists resist using a certain term to ‘describe’ her. I a...11 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 188)Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22 Larix occidentalis Nutt. Western Larch USDA LAOC: Flathead Food, Unspecified Cambium layer eaten in spring. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 22Native American Ethnobotany. Hardcover – August 15, 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native …Native American Ethnobotany. Working with Native American tribes, we are collecting, recording, and sharing information on their current and historical plant. Learn more from the links below.Brit - native american ethnobotany database https://agsci.oregonstate.edu/mes/sustainable/wildflowers/medicinal-uses/ethnobotany-native-american-cultures ...Plants and herbs for Native American traditional teas, food, medicines; ethnobotany databases. Field ID photos with native info, vocabulary. Books and teacher resources. ... American Indian Ethnobotany Database--At the University of Michigan. Almost 4,000 plantnames, uses for food, medicine (the emphasis), fiber, and utility. Botannical names ...109 native North American peoples from indigenous peoples of Mexico, Central and South America, 110 and many other places as well. The one significant Native American use of a consciousness ...Please check the Vendor Database, expected to be on-line through the PLANTS Web site in 2001 by ... Native American ethnobotany. Timber Press, Portland, Oregon. Phillips, H.R.. 1985. Growing and propagating wild ... Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe. Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 4:(3)327-525. ...Bella Coola Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, pages 197) Blackfoot Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Johnston, Alex, 1987, Plants and the Blackfoot, Lethbridge, Alberta. Lethbridge Historical Society, pages 17) Blackfoot Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail...University of Utah Press, page 62. View all documented uses for Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. Scientific name: Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. USDA symbol: SADOC5 ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Grayball Sage. Family: Lamiaceae. Family (APG): Lamiaceae. Native American Tribe: Kawaiisu. Use category: Other.Decoction of plant used as lotion for skin cuts on horses. Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40 (4):1-94, page 23. Eriogonum alatum Torr. Winged Buckwheat. USDA ERALA2. Navajo Drug, Analgesic. Plant used for pain.Distribution: This plant grows from British Columbia to California and east to northwestern Montana. This plant grows at the coast and on both sides of the Cascade crest in Washington. Height: This plant grows up to 24 to 48 inches (60 to 120 cm) in height. Flowers: Large, showy bright orange flowers are produced with deep-red or purple spots ...The Asteraceae is the largest family of plants in North America and is widely used as medicine by Indigenous peoples. This study investigated the medicinal ethnobotany of North American Asteraceae to identify taxa that appear preferentially selected or avoided for general and specific medicinal uses. Asteraceae-specific ethnobotanical reports recorded in the Native American Ethnobotany ...Salmonberry The Rose Family—Rosaceae. Rubus spectabilis Pursh. (ROO-bus spek-tah-BIH-lus) Rubus, derived from ruber, a latin word for red, is the genus of plants generally called brambles.The epithet spectabilis means spectacular due to Salmonberry’s showy flowers and fruits. The common name Salmonberry is thought to have come from the natives’ fondness for …Summary: "Native American Ethnobotany is a comprehensive account of the plants used by Native American peoples for medicine, food, and other purposes. The author, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman, has devoted more than 25 years to the compilation of the ethnobotanical knowledge slowly gathered over the course of many centuries and recorded in hundreds of …Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Southern Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia, Economic Botany 27:257-310, page 283 Monotropa uniflora L. Indianpipe USDA MOUN3: Cherokee Drug, Anticonvulsive Pulverized root given to children for fits, epilepsy and convulsions.Extended family and popular medicine on St. Helena Island, S.C.: adaptations to marginality (1974) Daniel Ellis Moerman (born 1941) is an American medical anthropologist and ethnobotanist, and an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. [2] He is known for his work relating to Native American ethnobotany and ...Cultural plant and use comparisons can be accessed through the Native American Ethnobotany Database. ... Native American Ethnobotany Database.Daniel E. Moerman Native American Ethnobotany Hardcover - August 15, 1998 by Daniel E. Moerman (Author) 4.7 314 ratings See all formats and editionsBocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 252 Aesculus californica (Spach) Nutt. California BuckeyeBocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 9 Eschscholzia californica Cham. California Poppy USDA ESCAC: Costanoan Drug, Poison 'Plant avoided by pregnant or lactating women as smell may be poisonous.'Ethnobotany Database. The development of the Prairie Ethnobotany Database is an essential part of our work and allows us to build on the leads provided by Native …The database now contains 44,691 items. This version added foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of over 44,000 items). This represents uses by 291 Native …Alaska Native Food, Fruit. Berries used for food. Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, page 97. Rubus parviflorus Nutt. Thimbleberry. USDA RUPAP2. Bella Coola Food, Preserves. Berries cooked with wild raspberries and other fruits into a thick jam, dried and used for food.12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a …Height : This plant grows up to 8 inches (20 cm) in height. Flowers: Small pink bell- or urn-shaped flowers are produced in few-flowered drooping terminal clusters near the tips of the stems. The flowers are less than 1/4 of an inch (5 mm) in length. Leaves: Alternate leaves are produced, oval in shape, dark green and shiny on the upper surface ...Documented uses. 102 uses documented. Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Hamel, Paul B. and Mary U. Chiltoskey, 1975, Cherokee Plants and Their Uses -- A 400 Year History, Sylva, N.C. Herald Publishing Co., pages 54) Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Taylor, Linda Averill, 1940, Plants Used As Curatives by Certain Southeastern Tribes ...Ojibwa Drug, Respiratory Aid detail... (Arnason, Thor, Richard J. Hebda and Timothy Johns, 1981, Use of Plants for Food and Medicine by Native Peoples of Eastern Canada, Canadian Journal of Botany 59 (11):2189-2325, pages 2302) Okanagan-Colville Drug, Dermatological Aid detail...12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for throat troubles.American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, pages 81) Tolowa Drug, Antidote detail... (Baker, Marc A., 1981, The Ethnobotany of the Yurok, Tolowa and Karok Indians of Northwest California, Humboldt State University, M.A. Thesis, pages 58)Alaska Native Food, Fruit. Berries used for food. Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, page 97. Rubus parviflorus Nutt. Thimbleberry. USDA RUPAP2. Bella Coola Food, Preserves. Berries cooked with wild raspberries and other fruits into a thick jam, dried and used for food.This database from the University of Michigan focus on the Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers that Native American Peoples derived from Plants. Bishop Museum - Ethnobotany Database In this database you can search or just click on the name of a plant used by Native Hawaiian and learn its medicinal and non-medicinal uses.Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 252 Aesculus californica (Spach) Nutt. California Buckeye(Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of the Menomini Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:1-174, pages 66) Meskwaki Drug, Antidiarrheal detail... (Smith, Huron H., 1928, Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:175-326, pages 221) Meskwaki Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail...Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 58 Penstemon barbatus ssp. torreyi (Benth.) Keck Torrey's Penstemon USDA PEBAT: Navajo Drug, Diuretic Infusion of plants taken as a diuretic. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM.UM-D Research Databases: UM-AA E-Mail Addresses: Oxford English Dictionary: Mirlyn Catalog: Medicinal Plants of Native America (MPNA) database: Native American Ethnobotany (AME) database: About MPNA: About AME: Webster's Dictionary: New York Times: NPR News: Banner/Telstar: Federation of Small Anthropology Programs (FOSAP)The University of Michigan-Dearborn has a searchable database of Native American ethnobotany by scientific and common names that sorts plants by the tribes that use them. Kathleen McDonald, the executive director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, began the program by recognizing the indigenous groups of Illinois, whom ...Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium. Fireweed. USDA CHANA2. Bella Coola Drug, Dermatological Aid. Poultice of roasted and mashed roots applied to boils. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 207. Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium.The medicinal knowledge of native North American peoples is extraordinary. Just how this knowledge was developed remains a mystery. Native American peoples came from Asia; the flora of Asia is in many ways similar to that of North America (Duke and Ayensu 1985). It is quite likely that the first migrants to the New World brought with them ...Toggle navigation Native American Ethnobotany DB. Home; Search Uses; Tribes; Species; About; Contact; Tribe: Apache Documented uses 54 uses documented Agastache pallidiflora ssp. neomexicana var. neomexicana (Briq.)11 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 188)Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium. Fireweed. USDA CHANA2. Bella Coola Drug, Dermatological Aid. Poultice of roasted and mashed roots applied to boils. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 207. Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium.Native American Ethnobotany Database includes foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of over 44,000 items). This represents uses by 291 Native American groups of 4,029 species from 243 different plant families. 2009-06-03; in History ; David E. JonesSmith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, page 421 View all documented uses for Pinus strobus L. Scientific name: Pinus strobus L.With racial justice at the forefront of our collective consciousness, there has arisen a growing outcry for Americans to reexamine the legacy of Christopher Columbus. In October of 2021, the White House under President Biden issued a procla...Using the online Native American Ethnobotany (NAEB) database, this study compiled a list of Asteraceae species and their ethnobotanical uses to identify tribes, genera, or species that are over-utilized as medicinal aids. It was hypothesized that the selection of North American Asteraceae species, based on reported uses by Indigenous peoples ...Here's a link to the Native American Ethnobotany database. It's a little tricky to use but it has a ton of information. Plug in the name of the plant you are looking for and you'll get a ton of Native American uses. If you click on the link in the name it will take you to the USDA plant database for a picture of the plant. Pretty cool.Bella Coola Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid. Simple decoction, compound decoction or infusion of leaf taken and used externally for stomach pain. Smith, Harlan I., 1929, Materia Medica of the Bella Coola and Neighboring Tribes of British Columbia, National Museum of Canada Bulletin 56:47-68, page 49.Jun 16, 2023 ... Native American Ethnobotany. A database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American Peoples, derived from plants. TRAMIL Library.11 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 188)Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 54 Verbesina encelioides ssp. exauriculata (Robins. & Greenm.) J.R. Coleman Golden Crownbeard USDA VEENE2: Navajo, Ramah Other, Ceremonial Items Used to make antelope prayer stick in Plumeway.Our program focuses on native plants and ethnobotany of the Midwest, Great Plains, and Mountain West. Our program began in 2009 as a broad-based search for medicinal compounds of plants in our region. Over 200 hundred plants were collected in the field and screened for anti-cancer and anti-oxidants. You can learn more about this work here.Many Native American groups collected blue cohosh for its anti-inflammatory properties. The Potawatomi and the Cherokee, for example, prescribed it during childbirth to reduce inflammation of the womb. The Fox, Menominee, Ojibwa, and Chippewa also used Blue Cohosh to suppress profuse menstruation. The statements above are sourced from:Compound infusion of tubers given to babies that start suddenly during sleep. Compound decoction used as wash for child who does not talk or laugh. Roots steeped or eaten. Wyman, Leland C. and Stuart K. Harris, 1951, The Ethnobotany of the Kayenta Navaho, Albuquerque. The University of New Mexico Press, page 50.109 native North American peoples from indigenous peoples of Mexico, Central and South America, 110 and many other places as well. The one significant Native American use of a consciousness ...Traditional folk medicine, on the other hand, dates as far back as 3700 B.C. Egypt (Fisher, 1997). Today, we call the study of these customs ethnobotany. Many tribes utilized forbs to treat headache pain: The Chippewa used spreading dogbane ( Apocynum androsaemifolium ), while the Navajo smoked coyote tobacco ( Nicotiana attenuata) and the ...Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 9 Eschscholzia californica Cham. California Poppy USDA ESCAC: Costanoan Drug, Poison 'Plant avoided by pregnant or lactating women as smell may be poisonous.'may Native American tribes including the Cherokee, Chippewa, Choctaw, Creek, Delaware, Oklahoma, Houma, Iroquois, Koasati, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Rappahannock, and Seminole. The medicinal uses of sassafras by Native Americans were many. Infusions made from the bark of the roots were taken internally as a preventive to ward off fever, as well as a ...The Asteraceae is the largest family of plants in North America and is widely used as medicine by Indigenous peoples. This study investigated the medicinal ethnobotany of North American Asteraceae to identify taxa that appear preferentially selected or avoided for general and specific medicinal uses. Asteraceae-specific ethnobotanical reports recorded in the Native American Ethnobotany ...The medicinal knowledge of native North American peoples is extraordinary. Just how this knowledge was developed remains a mystery. Native American peoples came from Asia; the flora of Asia is in many ways similar to that of North America (Duke & Ayensu, 1985). It is quite likely that the first migrants to the New World brought with them ...Extended family and popular medicine on St. Helena Island, S.C.: adaptations to marginality (1974) Daniel Ellis Moerman (born 1941) is an American medical anthropologist and ethnobotanist, and an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. [2] He is known for his work relating to Native American ethnobotany and ...Native American Ethnobotany. Hardcover – August 15, 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native …Founded in 1961, the Journal of American Indian Education (JAIE) is a journal featuring original scholarship on education issues of American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Indigenous peoples worldwide, including First Nations, Māori, Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander peoples, and Indigenous peoples of Latin America, Africa, and ...Native American Ethnobotany by Daniel E. Moerman. Publication Date: 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on ...Ethnobotany Database Our work gathering and recording Native American Use of plants into a centralized database. ©2023 Native Medicinal Plant Research Program | Built using WordPress and Responsive Blogily theme by SuperbUniversity of Utah Press, page 62. View all documented uses for Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. Scientific name: Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. USDA symbol: SADOC5 ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Grayball Sage. Family: Lamiaceae. Family (APG): Lamiaceae. Native American Tribe: Kawaiisu. Use category: Other.Luiseño Ethnobotany. Home | Fall | Spring/Summer | AIS | AS | Anthro. The Luiseño are the s outhwestern most group of Shoshonean people in the greater North American desert. The name Luiseño came from their close proximity to the Spanish mission San Luis Rey (1798-1834), which is located in northern San Diego County near Oceanside, California. Originally, the Luiseño …Oct 31, 2022 ... comprehensive ethnobotanical database due to prevent the traditional knowledge of ethnobotany ... [17] Native American Ethnobotany DB. Retrieved ...Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 204. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng. Kinnikinnick. USDA ARUV. Blackfoot Drug, Dermatological Aid. Infusion of plant, mixed with grease & boiled hoof, applied as a salve to itching and peeling scalp.Visit California will launch a new online platform promoting travel with the state's 109 federally recognized Native American tribes in 2023. This week, Visit California (the state’s tourism marketing arm) revealed plans to launch a new onl...Native American Ethnobotany Database is an impressive database of foods, drugs, dyes, and fibers of Native North American Peoples. Provided by Dan Moerman, Professor of Anthropology. Primitive Living Skills Links has a section for Edible & Medicinal Plants links.Use documented by: Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 53. View all documented uses for Medicago sativa L. Scientific name: Medicago sativa L. USDA symbol: MESAS ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Alfalfa. Family: Fabaceae.With racial justice at the forefront of our collective consciousness, there has arisen a growing outcry for Americans to reexamine the legacy of Christopher Columbus. In October of 2021, the White House under President Biden issued a procla...Fewkes, J. Walter, 1896, A Contribution to Ethnobotany, American Anthropologist 9:14-21, page 18 Asclepias verticillata L. Whorled Milkweed USDA ASVE: Hopi Food, Unspecified Leaves and young shoots boiled with meat and eaten. Fewkes, J. Walter, 1896, A Contribution to Ethnobotany, American Anthropologist 9:14-21, page 18Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Unspecified detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 124) Algonquin, Tete-de-Boule Drug, Cold Remedy detail...Infusion of fresh or dried plant taken for nausea. Hart, Jeffrey A., 1981, The Ethnobotany of the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 4:1-55, page 17. Achillea millefolium L. Common Yarrow. USDA ACMIM2. Cheyenne Drug, Cold Remedy. Infusion of fresh or dried plant taken for colds.Native American Ethnobotany - A database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American peoples, derived from plants. eHRAF Archaeology - A cross-cultural database containing information on the world's prehistory designed to …(Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, pages 422) Ojibwa Food, Beverage detail... (Arnason, Thor, Richard J. Hebda and Timothy Johns, 1981, Use of Plants for Food and Medicine by Native Peoples of Eastern Canada, Canadian Journal of Botany 59(11):2189-2325, pages 2234)Native American Ethnobotany A database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers, and more, by native Peoples of North America. Summer, 2003. This database has been online for many years. But this spring, with support from UM-Dearborn, it has been given a new look, and new functionality. First, the new look will be obvious to anyone who has used it in the …The medicinal knowledge of native North American peoples is extraordinary. Just how this knowledge was developed remains a mystery. Native American peoples came from Asia; the flora of Asia is in many ways similar to that of North America (Duke & Ayensu, 1985). It is quite likely that the first migrants to the New World brought with them ...G AGIS Medical Plants Native American DataBase (MPNADB)--Similar to the U. Michigan database, but with the money and resources of government agencies behind it, the database is a more powerful searcher on the 3700 plants it contains. ... Turner, BTW is an anthro who thinks kinikinnik and tobacco are Native American Ethnobotany, Plant Knowledge .... Haisla and Hanaksiala Fiber, Snow Gear detail...View all documented uses for Bahia dissecta (Gray) Britt. S Developed by the University of New Mexico, this database contains bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of Indigenous Peoples. Contains information on plant-based food, medicines, dyes, and textiles used by Indigenous peoples. Can you name the Indian tribes native to America? Most Using the online Native American Ethnobotany (NAEB) database, this study compiled a list of Asteraceae species and their ethnobotanical uses to identify …165 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 168) Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Cough Medicine detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. Here's a link to the Native American Ethnobotany database. It&#...

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